Make a Plan - Build a Kit


Have A Plan

Ready to Respond

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A good plan is relevant to your concerns and needs. It is simple, clear, and flexible. It is important to review it periodically and any changes must be made known to everyone involved. And most important, the plan needs to be KNOWN AND UNDERSTOOD, by everyone involved in your plan.

In a major emergency you will not have time be look for your plan to find phone numbers, etc. Having small wallet sized cards with important contact numbers and meeting place information should be given to everyone in your plan.

If you have au pairs, a nanny, housekeeper, they should know the plan. If English is not their first language be sure they understand their responsibilities.

Having a good plan could save your life, the people and pets you care about, and the life of a 1st Responder.


Designated Facilities

Facilities that are designated in Wayland's Hazardous Material Response Plan work with the Fire Department to ensure that their plans are up-to-date and comprehensive. The Fire Department is also coordinating their initial notification protocols.


For Your Business

  1. Have a plan and practice it. Review it periodically.
  2. Make sure all employees, especially new ones know the plan and understand their responsibilities. Be sure everyone knows about changes to the plan.
  3. Have an emergency coordinator and several alternates in case someone becomes incapacitated or is not there on a given day.
  4. Have a system in place to keep track of who is in the office.
  5. If possible identify people with medical problems.
  6. Have a system in place to help disabled workers.
  7. Practice evacuating from different exits. Know those exits.
  8. Have a system in place to verify everyone is out of the office.
  9. Have a designated meeting place.
  10. Have an out-of-state (out-of-region if possible) contact.
  11. Work with your local fire department and LEPC to identify hazardous materials that might be in your office even if you do not fall under the required reporting regulations.
  12. Have an emergency packet ready to take out of the building. Include emergency contacts for every employee; with medical needs noted if employees are willing to list them. The top sheet in this packet, encased in a protective clear film, should be a notification that all persons have left the office; the address of the office; the number of people that left; a contact phone number; and the location of the designated meeting place.
  13. The top sheet of your emergency packet should be easily but securely attached to the office's outside door for emergency responders to see (THIS STEP COULD SAVE A FIRST RESPONDER'S LIFE).
  14. Have a plan for sheltering in-place.
  15. In a case of sheltering in-place, have materials and supplies stored in a designated safe area on site. Know how to shut down air-conditioning, heat, etc. shut all windows doors and drafts. Close any vents. At a minimum have a working, battery operated, radio; flash lights; extra batteries; clock; phone, food and water; first aid kit; make shift sanitary system; duct tape; plastic, etc.


For Your Home

  1. Know the hazardous material risks in your community.
  2. Have a plan and practice it. Review it periodically.
  3. If you are a working parent or pet owner, form a neighborhood emergency cooperative with neighbors you trust to help your children and/or pets if an emergency occurs when you are not home. Incorporate them into your plans.
  4. Make sure everyone knows the plan and understand their responsibilities. Be sure people know of changes to the plan.
  5. Know all the plans of all the places where your family members regularly attend.
  6. Practice evacuating your home from different exits.
  7. Have a system in place to verify everyone is out of the house.
  8. Have a designated meeting place.
  9. Have an out-of-state (and if possible out-of-region) contact.
  10. Have an emergency kit ready to take with you if you have to evacuate. Include emergency contacts, medicines and important papers.
  11. Have an emergency kit for your pets ready to take with you if you have to evacuate. Include emergency contacts. Vaccination records, food and water. Current picture of animals and any medicines and a medical alert if appropriate. If you have crates or cages bring them. Do NOT leave your pets behind.
  12. Have a notification sheet ready, encased in a protective clear film, giving your address and name and stating that all persons and pets have left the home. List the number of adults, children and pets.The location of your designated meeting place which any plan should have. And an out-of- state contact number. This notification sheet should be ready to be easily but securely attached to your outside front door for emergency responders to see The top sheet of your emergency packet should be easily but securely attached to the office's outside door for emergency responders to see (THIS STEP COULD SAVE A FIRST RESPONDER'S LIFE).
  13. Have a plan for sheltering in-place. Identify the most air tight room in the house, preferably in an upper floor - most chemicals are heavier than air and will settle in lower areas. Close or cover all vents, including fireplace, stove, dryer, etc. Shut off air conditioning or heat/furnace and gas. Shut doors, window and any drafts. Go to your safe room.
  14. In a case of sheltering in-place, if possible have materials and supplies stored in your designated safe room. You should have a working, battery operated, radio; flash lights; extra batteries; clock; phone; food and water including for pets; clothing and bedding; first aid kit; medicines; a make shift sanitary system; fun diversions for children and adults; duct tape; plastic; etc.
  15. Keep a full tank of gas.

WHAT DO I NEED TO BUILD A KIT?

Douglas Leard 2014