Public Safety Notices

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WAYLAND POLICE DEPARTMENT


WAYLAND FIRE & EMS DEPARTMENT


1. If you experience a loss of power.


Here are some hints to remember if you experience a loss of power…These hints will help you report the problem properly and keep you safe:


Report your outage right away.
If your power goes out, callNSTAR at to 800-592-2000. This will help get the crews started on the outage repairs faster. Please call only once so other customers can get through. There is no need to call 911 or local emergency services.

Avoid downed power lines.All wires should be considered live until complete repairs are made. While wires are down, the safest place to be is inside your house. Never be in the vicinity of downed wires. Downed wires should be reported (once) to public safety agencies (use 911).

Don’t allow anyone to touch or drive over a power line - even an experienced electrician or electric company lineman can't tell if a line is energized just by looking at it. Always assume a downed line is dangerous, even if it's not jumping or sparking.

Use extreme caution when cleaning up storm damage on your property. If there are downed or damaged power lines put off you clean-up until complete utility repairs are made.

Candles Used for lighting.
Using candles during a power outage poses a great risk of fire. If you must use candles, put them on a solid and stable non-combustible surface, out of the reach of children and pets. And NEVER leave a candle burning when leaving a room or going to bed.

Do NOT enter a flooded home or building.
If yourhome or business is flooded, never enter standing water unless you’reabsolutely surethe main power has been shut off.

Do NOT attempt to assist emergency and utility crews with damaged wires. Allow the professionals to handle the emergency.


Just a reminder: Smoke and carbon monoxide detectors save lives! Install them, maintain them and react quickly when the alarm sounds!

Massachusetts Smoke and Carbon Dioxide Regs




2. Carbon Monoxide Dangers During Power Failures


For those of you that are employing generators to deal with power outages, it is important to remember that the exhaust from gasoline, diesel, propane, and natural gas-powered generators contain high levels of poisonous carbon monoxide (CO) that can quickly incapacitate and kill within minutes. Generator’s exhaust must not enter living areas of any buildings. Generators should only be used outside, far away from homes. Never run a generator inside a house, basement, garage, shed or near windows or vents to your house or a neighbor's house.


There have been over 800 carbon monoxide death involving generators in the last decade. These deaths are preventable. Where you run a generator can make the difference between life and death. The only safe place to operate a generator is outside in open air, placed far from your home, not in a garage or any enclosed space.


Heaters, stoves, and fireplaces, especially portable appliances, that run on any energy other than electricity also pose a carbon monoxide danger. Use only appliances the way they are intended to be used and follow the applicable laws and regulations about portable appliances. The laws are designed to protect you and your family.


Massachusetts laws and common sense require carbon monoxide detectors in every home that might experience a carbon monoxide problem. Make sure your carbon monoxide alarms are working so you have adequate protection against this odorless and colorless danger.


Carbon monoxide detectors that sound an alarm are a cause for concern. If your CO alarm activates, call 911 and report it to the fire department dispatchers. If you start to feel sick, dizzy, or weak, get to fresh air right away. Do not delay.


Just a reminder: Smoke and carbon monoxide detectors save lives! Install them, maintain them and react quickly when the alarm sounds!



3. Fire Dangers Associated with Power Outages


During a power outage, everyone is tempted to make their lives a normal as possible. This usually involves substituting a different energy source for the normal electric supply to the home. Generators, if used, should be properly installed and inspected to protect your house circuits and make sure that your generated electricity is not sent out on the damaged electrical grid outside your home. Carbon monoxide is also a major concern. Generator’s exhaust must not enter living areas of any buildings. Generators should only be used outside, far away from homes. Never run a generator inside a house, basement, garage, shed or near windows or vents to your house or a neighbor's house.


Portable liquid or gas fueled heaters are not legal to use inside habited buildings in Massachusetts. Charcoal or gas grills may be used outside, but never inside a home. Without permanent installation and venting, the danger of carbon monoxide and igniting nearby combustibles is far too great.


Flashlights and lanterns that use batteries as a source of energy are safe to use in the house. If candles are used, the real danger is the risk of fire. If you must use candles, put them on a solid and stable non-combustible surface, out of the reach of children and pets. And NEVER leave a candle burning when leaving a room or going to bed. Protect the area around the candle flame and keep combustibles away. Remember that candles change their size, shape, and weight as they burn.

Any portable appliances (including lanterns, heaters, etc.) that uses a gas or liquid as a fuel introduces the very real danger of unvented carbon monoxide. Keep these appliances outside.


Just a reminder: Smoke and carbon monoxide detectors save lives! Install them, maintain them and react quickly when the alarm sounds!

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Douglas Leard 2014